GARDENTRENDS FOR 2022

THE FORECAST FOR 2022?

Intention in the garden. Considering how everything—each plant, piece of garden art or furniture, structure, material, pot, and more—contributes to your space as  a whole.

The trendiest thing you can do in your garden is whatever makes you happy! While we encourage that to be your goal, we still love to share what’s rising in popularity, in hopes of providing some inspiration to gardeners everywhere.

Continue reading to see the garden trends forecast for 2022!

INCLUDING PLANTS  THAT TRANSPORT YOU TO THE TROPICS

If you’re new to tropicals, here are some beauties to get you started:

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– Caladiums (elephant’s ear), which come in varieties for shade or sun, are known for their showy foliage.  – Rose of Sharon is a hardy hibiscus with some varieties that can be grown down to Zone 5.  – Rose mallows offer stunning flowers similar to hibiscus. Many varieties are hardy to Zone 4.  – Cannas have jungle-like leaves and upright stems with blooms in colors ranging from pale pastels to vibrant oranges and reds.

BLURRING THE LINES BETWEEN INDOORS  AND OUTDOORS

Ways to bring the outdoors in:

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Ways to take the indoors out:

– Set up a small herb garden in front of a sunny window. – Place hanging planters outdoors, positioning them in front of a window so you can look out and see greenery. – Plant a climbing plant along a trellis that’s positioned next to a window so you can catch glimpses of it.

– Screen areas using tall shrubs or hanging plants to create the sense of enclosure you get indoors. – Provide ample lighting with string lights, uplighting, lanterns, and outdoor  lamps, etc. – Get comfy. A lounge chair or  hammock will make your  space more hospitable.

DESIGNING WITH  DARK FOLIAGE

Here are a few stunners to help make your bright flowers and vibrant foliage really pop:

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– Crape myrtle (Zones 6-10) is a deciduous tree known for its resilience. Try varieties with dark foliage such as Center Stage® Red. – Heuchera (Zones 4-9) thrive in a variety  of habitats and come in many colors.  A favorite dark variety is Primo® ‘Black  Pearl’ (pictured). – Ninebark (Zones 2-8) provides interest  all year with its peely bark. The dark leaves  of Summer Wine® Black contrast its  white flowers. – Smoke bush (Zones 4-8) offers striking color and large, showy flower panicles that create a smoky effect. We love Winecraft Black®. – Sweet potato vine is typically  grown as an annual and is  perfect for hanging planters.  Try Sweet Caroline Bewitched  After Midnight™.

GARDENING FOR A CHANGING CLIMATE

Gardening for firescaping:

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Gardening for flooding & excessive rain:

– Choose drought-tolerant plants that  retain water which are less likely to immediately ignite. – Avoid plants that have a lot of sap or  resin-materials used to start fires. – Add features such as stone paths or walls that function as a firebreak. – Prune back branches of trees that hang over structures.

– Create a swale to distribute water  more equally in an area. – Reduce runoff by including permeable surfaces that allow water to slowly  percolate into the soil. – Choose plants for erosion  control, especially on hillsides.  These plants have roots that run  deep and hold topsoil in place. – Select water-loving plants  for locations on your landscape  where water collects.

TAKING YOUR FOOD FROM START TO FINISH

For some gardeners, eating what you sow isn’t a new concept.  But others are just discovering the many benefits:

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– Ensuring clean eating. You control the type of soil, fertilizer, and seeds that are used. – Saving money. Buying 100 seeds is sometimes less expensive than buying  one transplant. – Experiencing joy. Taking your food from  seed to table is fun. – Involving kids. Kids are more likely to eat food they’ve grown. – Reducing your plastic use. You'll be purchasing less produce at the grocery store. You can also use Eco-Pots instead of plastic seed-starting trays (they also makes transplanting easier!).

GARDENING FOR  WILDLIFE

Gardeners are finding that you can have it both ways: a garden that’s beautiful and serves local wildlife. Looking for  some inspiration?

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– Reduce or replace your lawn with alternatives that do more to support pollinators, wildlife, and soil health. – Include water features that provide a place for wildlife to visit. – Use a diverse mix of plants that thrive in your region.

MAXIMIZING BALCONIES & PORCHES

Here are some ways to fit a lot of plants into a balcony garden or other small outdoor space:

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– Include large pots that can handle multiple plants (we like these stylish, self-watering ceramic pots). – Install shelves for smaller plants such as herbs and other annuals. – Affix chicken wire to your railing to grow vines or other climbing plants. – Hang pots from the roof of your space, if possible (here’s a great DIY on creating a vertical strawberry planter). – Put plant hangers on railing. – Mix edibles and ornamental plants in containers to conserve space.

CREATING GARDENS  FOR PEACE OF MIND

Gardens are good for our mental health. That’s why gardeners are becoming more intentional about what elements they add to their gardens, carefully selecting pieces that will draw them in.

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– Get sentimental. If there’s a plant that evokes fond memories of a loved one,  find a place for it. – Include colors that make you feel good. Decide which colors you do and do not want and keep that in mind as you select plants. – Create sensory connections:Include scented plants near spaces where you frequently spend time. Incorporate plants with soft textures near pathways so they brush up against you as  you walk through your garden.  Add the sound of water or plants  such as ornamental grasses  that make a lovely rustling  sound in a breeze.

Our landscapes offer the opportunity to serve as a refuge for our clients – restoring their energy and bringing them peace and quality of life. It starts with a landscape designer who listens to your individual needs and crafts a carful, thoughtful design.

Get more water feature & landscape ideas!